La memoria histórica right outside of Madrid

After a quick four days in Torremocha de Jarama, I still cannot believe I was there, let alone that I am now back at William and Mary. It was a whirlwind of a trip, and I am glad to be writing this because everything happened so fast that I have yet to get a chance to reflect on my experience.

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Preparing for a Research Experiment at VIMS

Next week, I begin my research experiment, and it has been nothing sort of a rollercoaster journey getting there. It began last year when I started volunteering at VIMS, the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. My mentor, Juliette, has spent the last few years looking at the transmission and evolution of a particular virus found in many fish species. We started talking about the possibility of me conducting a research experiment, but my spring and summer schedule made it impossible at the time, which was quite disappointing. But over the summer, she had another undergraduate student look at the transmission of the virus from dead fish to live fish and found there was a loss of transmission after several days.

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Breathing life into the memory of Spain’s Civil War

Sometimes I find myself wanting to begin this story with my study abroad experience in Spain this past summer, but in reality the independent study I’ve created this semester and my upcoming research trip back to Spain is the culmination of my academic passions of the past four years. This project really began with my early love for Brandon Stanton’s Humans of New York and my involvement with Humans of William and Mary. As early as my senior year of high school, I was beginning to hone in on what would become so important to me: the stories that shape us. Then, my sophomore year, during my study-away semester in DC, professor Chitralekha Zutshi introduced me to the field of oral history. Ever since then, any research project for any class I’ve taken revolves around the theme of oral history, and more recently, collective memory.

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Preliminary Fieldwork in Redfern and Waterloo

I am thankful that I had 15 days to conduct fieldwork in Sydney in August. While the majority of my dissertation fieldwork will take place over 9-12 months (hopefully starting in late Fall 2019), this trip was combination pilot study (to test potential validity of my site) and a preliminary dive into ethnography and interviewing. Some days though, I did have time to explore the citIMG_1415y and really “learn” my site in a way that is only possible through firsthand experience. Thankfully, another visitor to Circular Quay was nice enough to snap the photo to the left of me!

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Learning Sydney: Round 2

Since my inaugural trip to Australia last May/June, I’ve written my thesis and earned my master’s degree in Anthropology. The title of my thesis is The Gap on the Block: Subjectivity, Aboriginality, and Agency in Contemporary Urban Australia. My thesis explored the construction and maintenance of an Aboriginal subjectivity in a inner-city suburb (similar to our city neighborhoods in the States) of Sydney known as Redfern.

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Recruiting Study Participants

While we would all love to foresee and plan for every possible hiccup in the research process, we are still human, and thus we must continue to make adjustments all along the way to ensure the validity of our data and the ease of its collection. So, it is no surprise that after beginning a new semester of progress on my study, more concerns have arisen.

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Earthworks of Ijebu-Ode

Sequel to the archaeological survey carried out in Ijebu-Ode 2017, sites were identified and excavated in the 2018 field season. These sites are situated around the vicinity of earthworks. Earthworks are common in West Africa. Some researchers have argued that the functions of earthen architectural features in the form of banks, walls, and ditches vary from simple domestic usage to formal military defense of cities. Others have argued that they are defensive structures employed by elite and non-elites in their respective zones. In patterns, some earthworks appear in packed and clustered forms and are mostly boundary markers between landed property owners. Others are linear and extensive, enclosing a community. In the Yoruba-Edo region of Nigeria, these earthworks vary from small-scale enclosures surrounding modest compounds to walls around towns, and large-scale embankments enveloping urban centers. This year, I examined the Ijebu earthworks, in particular, those enclosing Ijebu-Ode, the capital of Ijebu polity. I report on the most recent survey and excavation carried out in Ijebu-Ode. I draw upon the relationship between Ijebu inner walls and the outer enclosures.Capture   Picture1

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Growing as a Dancer and Choreographer in a Liberal Arts Curriculum

By Hailey Arindaeng

It has been a few weeks since the performance of Evening of Dance, my eighth and final performance with Orchesis Modern Dance Company in Phi Beta Kappa Theatre. After a long journey of growth throughout my dance career at William & Mary, I wanted to take this time to reflect on how my dance experiences have come together and fit into a unique liberal arts education at the College.

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Sea Star Updates

In my last blog post, I spoke a bit about the developing Henricia that Dr. Allen and I have been working with. I am studying this large-egged brooding sea star to investigate the effects of reduced maternal investment. Since he had not worked with this species before, we decided to only observe this first set of embryos since the timeline for their development is still unclear. For my actual experimental data, I am planning to ablate one cell of the developing embryos once it gets to the two cell stage. However, the window of time that an egg spends in the two cell stage is small, so acutely understanding their development is necessary for the actual experiment.

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Investigating the effects of reduced maternal investment in sea stars

Hello! I am currently researching the effects of reduced maternal investment in large egged sea stars. Right now, I am working with the sea star Henricia. Initially, I had planned to use the grant to purchase a different genus of large-egged sea star, Solaster, but the long winter has not provided optimal conditions for our supplier to collect the sea stars from Maine. However, in his last shipment to Allen lab, the supplier provided a several extra Henricia, which allowed us to begin preliminary work on another large-egged sea star while waiting for the Solaster. Additionally, on Dr. Allen’s last trip to Maine, he collected a few individuals of Henricia, and as a result we had plenty to work with!

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